The end of an era: FTTP rollout comes to an end

One final rollout region, somewhere in the Wollongong Fixed-Line Serving Area, is expected to be the final FSAM to enter into the build preparation phase this month and appear on the rollout map in June. From there on in, it is expected that nbn™ will transition to the MTM, dropping the word “Fibre” from “Fibre Serving Area Module”, releasing Service Area Modules #SAMs# that will encompass multiple technologies in a single module

RIP.

Source: The end of an era: FTTP rollout comes to an end – jxeeno blog.

Is an NBN compromise still possible?

Netflix entry into the Australian market demonstrates how quickly change can occur. In the last ten years the relative size of telcos, handset manufacturers and media companies has seen the telcos dwindle by comparison. Coming together to promote a compromise bipartisan deal on the NBN not only ensures a better outcome for the nation but also protects the industry’s self-interests.

Source: Is an NBN compromise still possible? | Business Spectator

Verizon: fibre is MUCH cheaper than copper, we’re going all-FTTP

Sampath noted that one of the conversions, a New York CO, had to be replaced after it was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. However, even without a natural disaster, fibre’s advantages stack up fast: Real estate – savings are in the order of 60 – 80 per cent, since instead of 13 floors for a big exchange, a fibre-to-the-premises area needs just two;Energy savings – are between 40 and 60 per cent, in accordance with the company’s prior experience, for example in 2008 numbers cited by Australia’s communications minister Malcolm Turnbull;Reliability – DSL users suffering rain-driven outages will raise a hollow laugh to hear that Sampath claimed fibre is 70 to 90 per cent more reliable than copper. This results in 60 per cent fewer costly truck rolls on the fibre network, and savings of 40 to 60 per cent on maintenance.

This can’t be right. Malcolm wouldn’t mislead us like this.

Source: Verizon: fibre is MUCH cheaper than copper, we’re going all-FTTP • The Register