nbn meets Turnbull’s June 30 rollout targets

Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull today confirmed nbn would meet its rollout targets for the start of the 2015/2016 financial year, although the success appeared to be based almost entirely upon the continual deployment of Labor’s previous Fibre to the Premises model, and not the Coalition’s technically inferior multi-technology alternative.

Colour me surprised.

Source: nbn meets Turnbull’s June 30 rollout targets – Delimiter

Prime Minister Tony Abbott makes NBN speed promise his government can’t keep

When he was Opposition Leader, the Prime Minister infamously bungled a TV interview before the 2010 election where he struggled to explain the Coalition’s NBN.”I’m no Bill Gates here and I don’t claim to be any kind of tech head,” he told the ABC’s then 7.30 Report presenter, Kerry O’Brien.

No one appears to be a tech head in this party. so why do they feel qualified to make these decisions? The infrastructure should be based on the best technology for the job. Not on politics.

Source: Prime Minister Tony Abbott makes NBN speed promise his government can’t keep

The end of an era: FTTP rollout comes to an end

One final rollout region, somewhere in the Wollongong Fixed-Line Serving Area, is expected to be the final FSAM to enter into the build preparation phase this month and appear on the rollout map in June. From there on in, it is expected that nbn™ will transition to the MTM, dropping the word “Fibre” from “Fibre Serving Area Module”, releasing Service Area Modules #SAMs# that will encompass multiple technologies in a single module

RIP.

Source: The end of an era: FTTP rollout comes to an end – jxeeno blog.

Is an NBN compromise still possible?

Netflix entry into the Australian market demonstrates how quickly change can occur. In the last ten years the relative size of telcos, handset manufacturers and media companies has seen the telcos dwindle by comparison. Coming together to promote a compromise bipartisan deal on the NBN not only ensures a better outcome for the nation but also protects the industry’s self-interests.

Source: Is an NBN compromise still possible? | Business Spectator

Verizon: fibre is MUCH cheaper than copper, we’re going all-FTTP

Sampath noted that one of the conversions, a New York CO, had to be replaced after it was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. However, even without a natural disaster, fibre’s advantages stack up fast: Real estate – savings are in the order of 60 – 80 per cent, since instead of 13 floors for a big exchange, a fibre-to-the-premises area needs just two;Energy savings – are between 40 and 60 per cent, in accordance with the company’s prior experience, for example in 2008 numbers cited by Australia’s communications minister Malcolm Turnbull;Reliability – DSL users suffering rain-driven outages will raise a hollow laugh to hear that Sampath claimed fibre is 70 to 90 per cent more reliable than copper. This results in 60 per cent fewer costly truck rolls on the fibre network, and savings of 40 to 60 per cent on maintenance.

This can’t be right. Malcolm wouldn’t mislead us like this.

Source: Verizon: fibre is MUCH cheaper than copper, we’re going all-FTTP • The Register

Defence radar could interfere with NBN

Glenn Odlum, a principal engineer in Defence’s spectrum office, said Defence used spectrum between 3100 MHz and 3600 MHz for a “critical Defence radar capability”.

He indicated the impact of having public fixed wireless services and Defence radar in the same band remained unknown.

Oops?

via Defence radar could interfere with NBN – Telco/ISP – News – iTnews.com.au.

Japanese companies demo 40Gbps passive FTTP tech

The current generation of passive optical networks provide 2.488Gbps downloads and 1.244Gbps upload speeds – 10/2.5Gbps 10-GPON deployments are rare.

Japan’s Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) and Oki Electric Industry announced a successful demonstration of a passive optical access system that provided 40Gbps over 40 kilometres, serving 1024 users – 40 times the transmission capacity of existing systems, and 32 times more users than today’s passive optical networks (PONs).

Sure glad we are moving away from FTTP model for the NBN. That technology is clearly not future proof /sarcasm.

via Japanese companies demo 40Gbps passive FTTP tech – Networking – News – iTnews.com.au.

Turnbull says no need to future-proof NBN

Those who feel Australia should invest in a future-proof National Broadband Network (NBN), and that a fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) network offers the best long-term investment, have new reason to take umbrage with the nation’s communications minister Malcolm Turnbull after he yesterday said a quick-and-cheap approach is the best way to deliver broadband.

via Turnbull says no need to future-proof NBN • The Register.

Govt report pins Australias future on technology, but ignores NBN

While the report pins Australias future productivity on technological innovation, it makes no mention of the National Broadband Network (NBN) — the most expensive single civil infrastructure project in the countrys history.

However, it does say that “investment in new infrastructure and making better use of Australias existing infrastructure assets is important to generating economic activity in the near term as the economy transitions from resources-investment-led growth”.

Makes sense.

via Govt report pins Australias future on technology, but ignores NBN | ZDNet.