nbn meets Turnbull’s June 30 rollout targets

Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull today confirmed nbn would meet its rollout targets for the start of the 2015/2016 financial year, although the success appeared to be based almost entirely upon the continual deployment of Labor’s previous Fibre to the Premises model, and not the Coalition’s technically inferior multi-technology alternative.

Colour me surprised.

Source: nbn meets Turnbull’s June 30 rollout targets – Delimiter

Japanese companies demo 40Gbps passive FTTP tech

The current generation of passive optical networks provide 2.488Gbps downloads and 1.244Gbps upload speeds – 10/2.5Gbps 10-GPON deployments are rare.

Japan’s Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) and Oki Electric Industry announced a successful demonstration of a passive optical access system that provided 40Gbps over 40 kilometres, serving 1024 users – 40 times the transmission capacity of existing systems, and 32 times more users than today’s passive optical networks (PONs).

Sure glad we are moving away from FTTP model for the NBN. That technology is clearly not future proof /sarcasm.

via Japanese companies demo 40Gbps passive FTTP tech – Networking – News – iTnews.com.au.

Turnbull says no need to future-proof NBN

Those who feel Australia should invest in a future-proof National Broadband Network (NBN), and that a fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) network offers the best long-term investment, have new reason to take umbrage with the nation’s communications minister Malcolm Turnbull after he yesterday said a quick-and-cheap approach is the best way to deliver broadband.

via Turnbull says no need to future-proof NBN • The Register.

Govt report pins Australias future on technology, but ignores NBN

While the report pins Australias future productivity on technological innovation, it makes no mention of the National Broadband Network (NBN) — the most expensive single civil infrastructure project in the countrys history.

However, it does say that “investment in new infrastructure and making better use of Australias existing infrastructure assets is important to generating economic activity in the near term as the economy transitions from resources-investment-led growth”.

Makes sense.

via Govt report pins Australias future on technology, but ignores NBN | ZDNet.

Parish Park node complete

On from my last post the Parish Park node is complete, not powered yet though.

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A lot of activity happening up the other end of Parish Road close to Tullawong State School – The pit remediation on Parish Road is complete and the DP on the corner of the school near the lights has had several engineers working on it. Looks like there are new pits/pit work going on there.

A user on the whirlpool forums has started a node map.

Half The People Who Can Get The NBN Haven’t Done So, And We Judge Them

NBN Co, which is building the network, announced in its half-yearly results today that there were 748,552 premises which could now connect to the NBN as of the end of December 2014. Of those, 322,391 have done so, which is just 43 per cent of the serviceable premises. (That number is up 53 per cent on the previous year.)

The chances are good that many of those customers won’t migrate until the associated copper network is switched off. While NBN Co is now committed to a multi-technology mix which will see many people accessing broadband via copper to the nearest broadband node and others use pay TV cable, sites rolled out to date have still involved fibre to the premises.

I feel like I need to lecture these people in the same way I’d tell my son to eat his vegetables because there are kids around the world who would love them. Seriously though, 57% of people who have access to fibre haven’t signed up? That number seems a little large and/or scary.

via Half The People Who Can Get The NBN Haven’t Done So, And We Judge Them | Lifehacker Australia.

More node news for Caboolture FTTN Trial

There are more nodes coming in so the builds are surely underway. Photos below are from Parish Road,

Node in front of Parish Park:

IMG_0876Some close ups:

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The original distribution point (DA73 CAB0) in relation to the Node:

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This looks like where the power will come from for the node:

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There is also work occurring near the other end of Parish Road, near the school and the take away store, looks like Pit remediation:

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Distribution point (DA72 CAB0) is a little further way down the road in this case:

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Copper phone network to close in Darwin CBD, but some NBN customers air complaints

“NBN Co might not be having any issues but you might be having quite slow speeds because the technology youre using within your home is out of date or not quite up to scratch with what the NBN has on offer.”

Yep.

via Copper phone network to close in Darwin CBD, but some NBN customers air complaints – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

NBN Co’s new Telstra deal is as good as NBN will get

While we can argue Australia will now have a second-rate version of a national broadband network, the reality is that with the new $11 billion deal with Telstra inked, this will be as good as it will get for the foreseeable future.

It looks like all parties agree that under this new contract the government’s preferred model, the multi-technology mix, can and will be rolled out.

Telstra however, covered itself with a clause that any unexpected extra costs related to the multi-technology mix rollout will be taken care of by NBN Co. Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull is happy with that arrangement and is convinced these costs will not blow out, but in the end only time will tell if this will be the case.

Boy Turnbull looks happy with himself in the article’s photo. Way to destroy a great plan with this shoddy MTM mess.

via NBN Co’s new Telstra deal is as good as NBN will get.

Can we please just get on with the National Broadband Network?

The emerging NBN is barely capable of delivering a couple of high-definition video streams in real time, yet this is common in a modern family household with independent internet-enabled devices. If you want to download a one-hour standard definition video, it will take about five minutes. However, if you want to produce and upload such video content, it will take three hours. Upload figures for high definition and the emerging ultra-high definition video are about fifteen and thirty hours, respectively. Cloud-based services will continue to stumble as long as policy direction fails to recognise the importance of delivery of data into the network.

The much deeper issue is what happens after 2016. I’ve argued previously that “[o]ptical fibre is the only known viable technology beyond 2025. The only justification for considering anything else in the meantime is to buy us time”.

If only someone had the foresight to go straight for a FTTP design.. oh wait..

via Can we please just get on with the National Broadband Network?.